How You Can Figure Out What Kind Of Fishing Flies You Need

Finally, your long awaited week off has arrived. It has been too long since you’ve last put on those waders, and your fly rod has been collecting dust for weeks on end, not to mention that you can swear you heard your fishing flies planning something. It is time for your favorite pastime, and you are almost jittery in anticipation. It is fish week, and you are ready to rock n’ roll.

But do you know the ins and outs of fly fishing, and do you have your tools, supplies, and attire ready to hit the river, lake, flats, stream, or ocean with confidence and efficiency? You already have a rod, reel, and line, so you know what you need next. That’s right, fly fishing flies! Fishing flies are the one thing that requires the most know how to choose properly. Fly is a pretty broad term for such a small word. For those of you who are still beginners, fly fishing flies are creations tied – usually with thread, feathers, fur, wire and beads – onto a hook to resemble something that a fish might want to eat.

Nowadays, when talking about fly fishing, a fly can mimic almost anything a fish might eat – everything from a tiny flying midge to a mouse, from a waterborne worm to a snake. A good fly shop will have dozens of different types of fly fishing flies in stock and in several sizes of each type. You have the wet fishing flies that sink below the surface and dry flies that ride on top of the water. Then, there are fly fishing flies so small you actually need a magnifying glass to even see the eye of the hook, and fishing flies made so large you can catch fish bigger than a human with them.

When it comes to fly fishing, surprisingly, size matters; it depends on your hook. So what fishing flies size is best? The answer is the size the fish want. When deciding what type of fly fishing flies you need, your main objective is to find out what type of fish are in the water you want to go fishing in and what kinds of bugs might those fish be eating. Then buy some fishing flies that represent those bugs you are likely to find. But they could also be fish imitation flies, or worms or leaches or crawdads or even fish eggs.

But whatever you do do not make it harder than it is. This is supposed to be fun and especially relaxing. And definitely don’t let it be overwhelming. So, why not signing up for fly casting lessons before you buy something? Or maybe you can get a fly fishing friend for at least one day and actually try it and see how you do and what you need, before you buy any gear. And if you take a guide he will provide everything you need – including some first timer instruction. You just go along and get acquainted with the process, the gear, and maybe even catch a fish or two. But always go for catch and release!

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